Little Saigon Larkin Street Festival

Join the Tenderloin Museum at the Little Saigon Larkin Street Festival Saturday June 4th from 12-4pm. The Larkin Street Merchants Association is hosting a block party to honor the Little Saigon/Larkin Corridor. We will have activities for kids and adults like Bánh mì eating contest, arts and crafts, street games, zucchini racers, live art, a bounce house and gigantic bubbles! There will be 2 stages one with music curated by RS94109 and another with live performances including traditional Vietnamese dances. The beer garden will have special drinks by Whitechapel Gin Bar and TONS of food from local favorites like Soul Groove, The Chairman, Rusty's Southern and more! Fleet Wood SF will be offering free screen printing demos. And don't forget to bring your bike! San Francisco Yellow Bike Project will be there doing bike repairs and tune ups. The Tenderloin Museum will be hosting public art project Temporal Cities. Visit our booth and tell us your Tenderloin stories.

About Temporal Cities:

Temporal Cities examines the experience of living in San Francisco’s Tenderloin neighborhood, through the stories of its residents.

The Temporal Cities archive focuses on the experience of place—what imprint a place leaves on a person, and what imprint a person leaves on a place— in the midst of urban change. Collaborating artists Lizzy Brooks and Radka Pulliam both live in the Tenderloin.They have been collecting stories since November of 2014, in collaboration with galleries and community organizations in the neighborhood. In 2016, they will exhibit the stories via a website, a book and an experimental film.

They invite participants to anonymously share a memory that took place in the neighborhood, either by writing, drawing, or speaking. The stories that residents share enter a physical and digital archive, which, through its variety, paints a nuanced picture of the Tenderloin community.

The motivation in creating Temporal Cities is to engage our community in a conversation about place and personhood that transcends polarizing debates about change in San Francisco. The accessibility of the prompts and materials has created an inclusive environment that welcomes newcomers and longtime residents. The work reflects our moment of transition, in the Tenderloin, in the Bay Area, and in cities across the country. The change is rapid and hard to wrap our heads around. In this moment, we feel strongly that our work is to listen, to look inward and to observe, to share the shifting ground with our neighbors and to acknowledge one another.