Raphael Villet - Artist in Residence Celebration
Jun
1
5:00 pm17:00

Raphael Villet - Artist in Residence Celebration

Join us for the culmination of Artist Raphael Villet's 5 month residency at the Tenderloin Museum of San Francisco. Raphael will release an Anthology book that will house all the zines made by 45+ people in the Tenderloin during his residency. The exhibition will chronicle the 5 months that Raphael spent facilitating a space on the street for people to make art, write stories and share knowledge through zines!


This is Not a Gun Closing Reception
May
24
6:00 pm18:00

This is Not a Gun Closing Reception

For the month of May at the Tenderloin Museum Gallery, artists Amanda Eicher and Cara Levine have activated an interactive artwork and exhibit titled This Is Not A Gun as a part of 100 Days Action. On Wednesday, May 24 from 6-8PM the exhibit will close with a community dialogue and art-making workshop led by Amanda Eicher. Throughout these first 100 days, sculptor Cara Levine has been carving wood replicas of common objects mistaken by police as weapons that resulted in police shootings, based on a list of these objects published in Harper’s Magazine in December 2016. About her sculptural inquiry, the artist says, “We do not know the outcome of these shootings. We do know that none of these items are guns. We want to understand this error. We want to understand through questioning, grieving, looking, and making. We want to understand together, as community.” Amanda Eicher, artist and organizer has engaged in continual dialogue with both Bay Area community and Richmond Police members surrounding this national crisis. Through this series of dialogues and hands-on workshops, Amanda Eicher and Cara Levine invite the public to honor and try to understand these objects, and the lives they have impacted. Participants will sculpt their own replica objects out of clay and be invited to contribute to an open dialogue as a part of the artist talk and exhibit closing workshop at the Tenderloin Museum on May 24.

Tenderloin Museum Turns Two
May
13
4:00 pm16:00

Tenderloin Museum Turns Two

The Tenderloin Museum marks its 2nd anniversary in the midst of an important year in the history of San Francisco – it’s the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love and the 100th anniversary of the “anti-vice” Tenderloin neighborhood shutdown. On Saturday, May 13, the Tenderloin Museum is inviting its friends and neighbors to celebrate the Tenderloin’s unique contributions to San Francisco history with daylong free museum admission and free public programs from 4 pm to 9 pm, featuring accounts of the “Invisible Circus” from the Diggers, San Francisco Chronicle Columnist David Talbot, the first-ever reading of the new play The Compton’s Cafeteria Riot, and a dynamic jazz night by SF Recovery Theater. We’re excited to show off the best the neighborhood has to offer and celebrate the 31 square blocks we call home.

Programming Schedule:

 4pm, The Diggers' "Invisible Circus" Remembered

Come hear what the Summer of Love was like in the Tenderloin. Judy Goldhaft (original participant in the Diggers) and Eric Noble (Diggers archivist) talk with LisaRuth Elliott (Shaping San Francisco's co-director) about who the Diggers were, and their radical anti-capitalist philosophy and activities. They will share archival materials and personal experiences from the Diggers' "Invisible Circus" Happening at Glide Church on February 24, 1967. Stories about the "Invisible Circus" became legend in San Francisco’s hip community for years. Originally billed as a 72 hour event, participants were thrown out within 24 hours. See the poster from the event and hear stories of the spectacle from the Diggers themselves.

 5pm, David Talbot on the Summer of Love, Season of the Witch, and the Tenderloin

Author of the best selling book on San Francisco’s Summer of Love and its aftermath, San Francisco Chronicle columnist David Talbot gives his unique perspective on this seminal time in history.

 6pm, The Compton’s Cafeteria Riot

Join us for the first-ever reading of scenes from a new play about Tenderloin history, The Compton’s Cafeteria Riot, based on events surrounding the United States’ first-ever anti-police riot by the LGBTQ community. Followed by dazzling drag performances by co-authors Donna Personna & Collette LeGrande, and joined by Olivia Hart (all featured in James Hosking’s film about Aunt Charlie’s bar, Beautiful by Night). The play is being co-produced by the Tenderloin Museum and writer Mark Nassar, co-creator of Tony n’ Tina’s Wedding, and will premiere this fall in the Tenderloin.

 7:30, SF Recovery Theater: Night at the Black Hawk

Join us for a raucous tour-de-force performance of some of the best musical talent in the neighborhood! Night at the Black Hawk is a live jazz concert, part of an ongoing series that reflects on the lives and stories of the artists, musicians, and residents that lived in the shadow of the Black Hawk Jazz Club.

This is Not a Gun, Presented by 100 Days of Action & TL Museum
Apr
30
11:00 am11:00

This is Not a Gun, Presented by 100 Days of Action & TL Museum

This April 30th explore the Tenderloin neighborhood car free at Sunday Streets. Activity Hubs will be located on Ellis and Golden Gate Ave with dozens of free activities in between offered by local merchants (the Tenderloin Museum will be exhibiting at Ellis and Leavenworth). As part of our Sunday Streets activation, the Tenderloin Museum will be hosting a workshop, 100 Days of Action: This Is Not A Gun, at the TL Museum (398 Eddy St) from 11 am - 2 pm.
 

53 Days, Locals on Stage
Apr
27
6:30 pm18:30

53 Days, Locals on Stage

Hotel workers tell their story. 
The rich history of organized labor in the Tenderloin includes that of today's largest San Francisco private sector union. UNITE HERE Local 2 represents approximately 12,000 hotel and restaurant workers in San Francisco and northern San Mateo county. Members of the union will read excerpts from the play, 53 Days - Local 2 on Stage, and discuss the 2004 hotel industry lockout and strike which it depicts. 

 Come see a section of this production and talk to the workers about their experience on the picket line and the proscenium. 53 Days, Local 2 on Stage is a docudrama re-creation about labor rights and speaks to the workers about their experience on the picket line. Join us for an evening celebrating the history of the labor movement in the Tenderloin.

Presented by Bill Shields, the Chair of Labor and Community Studies at City College of San Francisco, and the director of the oral history theater project, "Work Tales". 

Lidia Yuknavitch / The Book of Joan
Apr
20
7:30 pm19:30

Lidia Yuknavitch / The Book of Joan

Join us as we welcome Lidia Yuknavitch for her much-anticipated novel The Book of Joan!

A raucous celebration, a searing condemnation, and a fiercely imaginative retelling of Joan of Arc’s transcendent life. -- Roxane Gay, New York Times-bestselling author of Bad Feminist

The Book of Joan is a riveting tale of destruction and the beauty found in unlikely places—even at the extreme end of post-human experience. A book suffused with dirt, sweat, and blood, it raises questions about what it means to be human, the meaning of sex and gender, and the role of art as means for survival.

Artist Talk with Alice Combs and Susa Cortez More Than a Roof and Walls: Community Art Show
Apr
13
6:00 pm18:00

Artist Talk with Alice Combs and Susa Cortez More Than a Roof and Walls: Community Art Show

Root Division and Tenderloin Museum present a special evening in conversation with artists Alice Combs and Susa Cortez on Thursday, April 13th, 2017. The artists will discuss their individual art practices, and how they approach their role as teaching artists for Root Division, currently working with Tenderloin neighborhood residents. Combs and Cortez are interdisciplinary artists that have practices inclusive of traditional painting and drawing, sculpture, installation and performance. Utilizing their varied skill sets they have developed customized curriculum for students at  Kelly Cullen Community, Larkin Street Youth, and Community Housing Partnership, including the collaborative printmaking and collage projects that are currently on view alongside their own work at the Tenderloin Museum.

San Francisco Recovery Theatre's Night at the Black Hawk
Mar
30
6:30 pm18:30

San Francisco Recovery Theatre's Night at the Black Hawk

San Francisco Recovery Theatre is returning to the Tenderloin Museum Thursday March 30th! Night at the Black Hawk is a live jazz concert, part of an ongoing series that reflects on the lives and stories of the artists, musicians and residents that lived in the shadow of the Black Hawk Jazz Club. This live jazz event is free and open to the public, donations accepted and appreciated.


With the loss of so many artistic and iconic figures in 2016, not to mention the unsure political footing we find ourselves in, we are left with an open wound that needs healing. San Francisco Recovery Theatre is once again pledging its commitment to provide a safe place for those that are still suffering, their family members and those in recovery. Join us on this special date in celebrating the wealth of talent that exists in our community.

Counterpulse: Oral Portraits
Mar
23
7:00 pm19:00

Counterpulse: Oral Portraits

Arletta Anderson & Adam Smith, in partnership with the Tenderloin Museum and CounterPulse, present an evening of oral histories and portrait-taking of Tenderloin residents, community members, and a few stalwart volunteers. In front of a live audience, interviewees will discuss their relationship to and memories of San Francisco and the Tenderloin and how these spaces have shifted their bodies and lives over time. "Through live interviews we hope to create a portrait of not just how the city is, has, and continues to change, but how individuals have also changed over time. In this current political climate, taking a moment to come together to share our stories and reflect on our capacity to experience change is paramount to our humanity and relationship to community," Anderson and Smith shared.

Watch or participate-throughout the evening, attendees will have the opportunity to be interviewed while having their portraits taken. Oral Portraits is an invitation to reflect on living in an ever-changing landscape and hopes to capture a brief moment in participants’ lives through the simple acts of photography and conversation.

Arletta Anderson & Adam Smith make multidisciplinary work that brings together movement, theater and music. Currently artists-in-residence at CounterPulse, their newest work weather // body will be presented there April 20th through the 29th. Oral Portraits is a performance research project in support of that work.

More Than a Roof and Walls: Community Art Show
Mar
16
6:00 pm18:00

More Than a Roof and Walls: Community Art Show

Root Division is proud to present the work of our Studio Artists and students at the Tenderloin Museum this spring. More Than a Roof and Walls features the work of Alice Combs and Susa Cortez alongside the work of their intergenerational students at several of our Tenderloin community partnerships including Kelly Cullen Community, Community Housing Partnership & Larkin Street Youth.

Root Divison teaching artists volunteer to teach residents and clients weekly creating meaningful art projects and experiences for populations that are settling into new homes and communities. The classes serve as a creative outlet for the imaginations of students while introducing them to a wide range of materials, projects, and ideas.

Gay San Francisco / Meat Rack
Mar
9
6:45 pm18:45

Gay San Francisco / Meat Rack

On March 9th, 2017, Tenderloin Museum will host a double feature screening of Gay San Francisco (1965-1970, 30 mins) by Jonathan Raymond, and Meat Rack by Michael Thomas (1970, 70 mins) at the Roxie Theater. Gay San Francisco is a previously lost documentary, and Meat Rack is an underground film with a modern arthouse cult following. Both films depict the early queer movements in the Tenderloin, unveiling the district as the first gay neighborhood in San Francisco. Meat Rack director Michael Thomas in attendance!

The softcore rarity Meat Rack was originally produced and released by Sherpix, the company that brought underground films like Lonesome Cowboys, Pink Narcissus, and Invocation of My Demon Brother to a nationwide circuit of art house theaters. Shot mostly on the mean streets of San Francisco, this is a gritty, brooding tale of a bisexual hustler who’ll go to bed with any man or woman who offers him enough money and sexual kicks. Using both sexploitation and art film aesthetics, Meat Rack is an essential and compelling artifact of pre-hardcore adult cinema. 
 

TL Dreams: Rea Lynn de Guzman
Feb
23
6:30 pm18:30

TL Dreams: Rea Lynn de Guzman

Join Root Division and the Tenderloin Museum for an artist lecture & closing reception of Rea Lynn de Guzman's TL Dreams on Thursday February 23rd. Learn about Rea’s process and hear about her experiences growing up in the Tenderloin; Doors at 6:30pm, Program at 7pm.

Rea Lynn de Guzman is an interdisciplinary artist whose work explores psychological and socio-political themes surrounding liminal identity, cultural assimilation, and the Filipino/a diaspora, tempered by her experience as a Filipina immigrant living in the United States. At the age of fourteen, she emigrated from the Philippines to the United States with her single mother, settling eventually in San Francisco. She lived in the Tenderloin—at Turk and Taylor Streets—where she spent most of her formative years (circa 2000-2005).

Black History Month Film Series: Skywatchers Movie Night
Feb
22
5:30 pm17:30

Black History Month Film Series: Skywatchers Movie Night

Black History Month Film Series is a collaboration of ABD Productions/Skywatchers and community partners Tenderloin Museum, TL Votes, Faithful Fools, and Glide. These organizations will be hosting screenings of the films 13th, The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution, and Free Angela and All Political Prisoners at various locations throughout the Tenderloin, concluding in a facilitated discussion each night.

“Free Angela and All Political Prisoners” - Presented by the Tenderloin Museum
February 22nd at the Tenderloin Museum (398 Eddy Street) 5:30 pm

Free and open to the public.

Centennial of the Insuppressible Tenderloin
Feb
15
Feb 16

Centennial of the Insuppressible Tenderloin

The Tenderloin Museum and the Black Cat present an evening in recognition of the centennial anniversary of the Tenderloin vice district closures of 1917, on February 15, 2017 from 5:30 pm - 1 am. Join us for an evening of live entertainment at the Black Cat and celebrate 100 years of resistance to traditional social mores in the Tenderloin.

The historical efforts by reformers to close and establish a “moral” alliance in the heart of the Tenderloin, denying working women and their patrons essential freedoms and protections concluded with a neighborhood wide closure of bars and bordellos (including the original Black Cat) on February 15, 1917. Having closed down San Francisco’s notorious Barbary Coast for good in 1913, reformers assumed that they had also won a thorough cleanup of the Tenderloin once and for all. Only a few short years after reformers declared victory, the Tenderloin came back stronger than ever. The 1917 campaign would be the first of many establishment attacks on the Tenderloin’s challenge to traditional social values. 

Open to the public. Bar is first come, first served. To make a reservation for dining: www.opentable.com/r/black-cat-san-francisco

Temporal Cities: Residency Showcase
Feb
9
6:30 pm18:30

Temporal Cities: Residency Showcase

Temporal Cities is multimedia collaboration between artists Lizzy Brooks and Radka Pulliam. Over the last three years, through a sidewalk booth, they collected stories and memories from residents of San Francisco's Tenderloin neighborhood, where they both live. Inspired by more than 300 stories, they have been working on a film, a website and a book.

You are invited to come view their work in progress, make your own zine out of your favorite printed stories, drawings and photographs of participants, and watch the 25 min film that uses a mix of technologies, images, and memories recorded and forgotten. You will discover layered history of our neighborhood, always incomplete and unfinished, a patchwork of personal stories that disappear into cracked sidewalks. 

The Tenderloin Museum first hosted Temporal Cities’ collection booth in the winter 2015. During the museum’s regularly scheduled evening events, Temporal Cities projected images in the window to attract passersby and event attendees to the installation, where they were encouraged to share a personal story using a typewriter, clipboard and pen, or a rotary phone turned into an audio recorder. The accessibility of the prompts and materials has created an inclusive environment that welcomed newcomers and longtime residents. Temporal Cities has intended to engage the Tenderloin community in a conversation about place and personhood that transcends polarizing debates about change in San Francisco. 

In an on-going collaboration with the Tenderloin Museum, Temporal Cities received support from the Neighborhood Artist Collaborative grant, to produce three themed collection events, a story-sharing booth installation at the TL Museum, and this event- a residency showcase to share their collection of stories with the larger San Francisco community. 

You can view or contribute a story at http://www.temporalcities.org/

The Magic of Danté! A Special Presentation of Fog City Magic Fest
Jan
27
4:30 pm16:30

The Magic of Danté! A Special Presentation of Fog City Magic Fest

Join the Tenderloin Museum and the EXIT Theatre for a special presentation of Fog City Magic Fest: The Magic of Danté! This family friendly event is part of the 2nd Annual Fog City Magic Fest presented by the EXIT theater, running from January 25th to the 28th 2017. The Magic of Danté is presented to the Glide Family, Youth & Childcare Center, but all neighborhood children are invited to attend, free of charge. Join Danté, family magician extraordinaire, the EXIT Theatre, and the Tenderloin Museum, for a special family neighborhood magic extravaganza.

100 Years of the Sex Workers’ Rights Movement
Jan
25
5:30 pm17:30

100 Years of the Sex Workers’ Rights Movement

On January 25th, join the Tenderloin Museum and the Center for Sex & Culture to celebrate the 100th anniversary of San Francisco's 1917 sex worker march. On January 25th, 1917 Reggie Gamble and Maude Spencer, two madams of the Uptown Tenderloin vice district, organized a demonstration against the planned Valentine's Day eviction of San Francisco's brothels. Targeting anti-vice reformer Rev. Paul Smith, nearly 300 prostitutes stormed the reverend's church and took over the pulpit, demanding that the congregation hear their concerns. Reggie Gamble's speech, which was covered by every one of the city's major newspapers, demanded economic justice and a halt to the looming evictions that threatened to displace the thousands of sex workers that lived and worked in San Francisco's vice districts. The 1917 march, the first of its kind in the United States, sits alongside the protests at San Francisco's Compton Cafeteria and the New York's Stonewall Inn as important historical events reclaimed by communities, and an important milestone in the struggle for sex worker’s rights.

100 Years of the Sex Worker’s Rights Movement will begin on Wednesday, January 25th at 5:30pm at the Tenderloin Museum. A $10 suggested donation will be taken at the door (no one turned away for lack of funds). Refreshments will be available. The procession to the original protest site, just two blocks from the Tenderloin Museum, will leave at 8:15pm. If you plan on attending the march, warm clothes, candles, and signs are encouraged.

Tenderloin Museum Annual Volunteer Fair 2017
Jan
18
6:30 pm18:30

Tenderloin Museum Annual Volunteer Fair 2017

The Tenderloin Museum is pleased to announce our annual Volunteer Fair will take place on Wednesday, January 18th. This is a chance to hear first hand from a select group of amazing service nonprofits in the neighborhood. A 6:30 pm reception will be followed by brief presentations from a selection of local service organizations. Come learn about the fantastic work being done by these organization to help our community, and find out ways you can get involved. Participants include Glide, Project Open Hand, De Marilliac Academy, 826 Valencia Tenderloin Center, Care Through Touch, Larkin Street Youth Services, the Gubbio Project and more!

Unseen Tenderloin: Presentation and Collection Viewing at CHS
Jan
11
6:00 pm18:00

Unseen Tenderloin: Presentation and Collection Viewing at CHS

  • California Historical Society

Join the California Historical Society and the Tenderloin Museum in exploring rare and unseen moments in the Tenderloin neighborhood. Randy Shaw, author of *The Tenderloin: Sex, Crime, and Resistance in the Heart of San Francisco* and Tenderloin Museum Board Member, will present a slide show of images from the neighborhood from 1907 to 1971. Afterward join us for a book signing and viewing of Tenderloin materials in the CHS Collections.

Lunch Time Speaker Series: David Chiu
Dec
12
12:00 pm12:00

Lunch Time Speaker Series: David Chiu

Bring your lunch and join us Monday December 12th  for our next Lunch Time Speaker Series event, with David Chiu- Assemblymember of the CA State Legislature, and the first Asian American to represent the 17th Assembly District, which encompasses eastern San Francisco, and includes our Tenderloin neighborhood.

Before joining the State Assembly, David Chiu served as President of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors for six years. With a reputation as a consensus maker, Chiu was the first Board President in San Francisco history elected by fellow Supervisors to three consecutive terms, and the first Asian American to hold the post. Chiu will be interviewed by Tenderloin Museum founder Randy Shaw, and questions will be taken from the audience.

Tenderloin Holiday Bazaar
Dec
8
6:00 pm18:00

Tenderloin Holiday Bazaar

Join the Tenderloin Museum Thursday December 8th for a holiday celebration and festive shopping opportunity. Exclusive merchandise will be on sale including photography, prints, ceramics, leather accessories, vintage apparel, handmade textiles, succulent planters, and many more unique items. Come support local artisans, while carrying out all of your holiday shopping needs!

There will be music, refresments and holiday treats. You bring the festive spirit, your love of shopping, and the arts!!!

 

Quiet Lightning SEVEN YEAR anniversary
Dec
5
7:00 pm19:00

Quiet Lightning SEVEN YEAR anniversary

Quiet Lightning celebrates seven years of literary mixtapes with #102, curated by Josey Rose Duncan and Jonathan Carroll through a blind selection process and published as a book (sPARKLE & bLINK  80) with art by Jon Garaizar, free for the first 100 people. Free show. All ages. Cheap Lagunitas drafts. Giveaways! Thanks to a grant from the San Francisco Arts Commission all of our artists are paid—come to this show and be a part of the next: quietlightning.org.

7pm doors / 7:30 show

Gay San Francisco: Lost Film, 1965-1970
Dec
1
6:30 pm18:30

Gay San Francisco: Lost Film, 1965-1970

On December 1, the Tenderloin Museum will screen a piece of rediscovered history: Gay San Francisco by Jonathan Raymond, a previously lost documentary depicting queer life in San Francisco five decades ago. 

Shot between 1965-1970, Gay San Francisco features a collection of incredible footage of San Francisco’s thriving LGBTQ culture, with a focus on the Tenderloin, San Francisco’s first queer neighborhood. Scenes from gay bars are intercut with fascinating interviews featuring gay men, lesbians, and trans women discussing issues from harassment to sex to job security. The film also includes a not-to-be missed Halloween drag show at On The Levee, one of SF’s many historic gay bars that closed it’s doors long ago. 

Filmmakers Susan Stryker and Victor Silverman unearthed this film while researching their Emmy-winning documentary Screaming Queens: The Riot at Compton's Cafeteria, which included footage from Gay San Francisco. Victor Silverman will be on hand to discuss this period in San Francisco history, and why this footage became an integral part of Screaming Queens. 

This screening compliments the Tenderloin Museum’s first major temporary exhibition, The Unseen World of the Tenderloin: Rare Historic Photographs 1907-71.

 

The Unseen World of the Tenderloin: Rare Historic Photographs, 1907-71
Nov
15
5:30 pm17:30

The Unseen World of the Tenderloin: Rare Historic Photographs, 1907-71

“The Tenderloin – so what’s to like?... What’s to like is the action, the struggle to survive on one’s own terms, the togetherness of losers and loners…” – Herb Caen

The Tenderloin Museum’s first major temporary exhibition, The Unseen World of the Tenderloin highlights both historic neighborhood scenes and the intimate spaces familiar to its inhabitants. Rare photos of backstage dressing rooms, streetscapes, legendary clubs, and daily hangouts together form a kaleidescopic view, showcasing the diversity and energy that the neighborhood is still known for today.

The Tenderloin is where San Francisco keeps its secrets – home to underground gay bars, illicit nightclubs, and the core of the vice industry. It’s also where everyday people have lived, worked, and made art for generations. Over the decades, these unlikely neighbors have created one of the city’s most tightly-knit communities, wrought by the Tenderloin’s dynamism, chaos, and unique beauty.

Members-only preview: Tuesday November 15th, 5:30pm Reception, 6:30pm Program

Become a member today! http://www.tenderloinmuseum.org/membership/

Election Insights: Lunch Time Speaker Series
Nov
7
12:00 pm12:00

Election Insights: Lunch Time Speaker Series

Bring your lunch and join us Monday Nov 7th for the relaunch of Lunch Time Speaker Series, with Randy Shaw of Beyond Chron, Cindy Wu, Chair of the San Francisco Democratic Party, and Joe Fitzgerald Rodriquez of the SF Examiner. Shaw, Rodriquez, and Wu will be at the Tenderloin Museum at noon the day before the election to give their picks and analysis of key local, state and national elections. Candidates and ballot measures will be dissected and discussed. Join us and debate your picks with our panel of pundits; Lively, spirited debate encouraged.

Drugs in the Tenderloin: Another Hole in the Head Film Festival
Nov
6
Nov 9

Drugs in the Tenderloin: Another Hole in the Head Film Festival


Drugs in the Tenderloin is a documentary shot guerilla style, directed by Robert Zagone in 1966; it captures the Tenderloin as it transformed into a center for young queers and drug users.The film is a chance to catch a rare glimpse of the Tenderloin’s past, and to hear first hand from the people who lived there. The film was rediscovered by the Tenderloin Museum and played a series of sold-out shows at the Tenderloin Museum and the Roxie Theater in 2015 & 2016. Join the Tenderloin Museum on Nov 6th & Nov 9th for the film festival debut of this memorable lost film.

Q&A with director Robert Zagone immediately following the film.

The Spooky, Strange, and Magical History of San Francisco
Oct
25
6:30 pm18:30

The Spooky, Strange, and Magical History of San Francisco

On Oct 25th, Magician, storyteller, and long time Artist in Residence at EXIT Theatre, Christian Cagigal, will share his favorite stories of San Francisco's fantastic and forgotten past. The Mother of Civil Rights in California who still haunts the six eucalyptus on Octavia Street, the Founder of the Church of Satan that lived in the Outer Richmond, and the world famous magician whose show stopped traffic on the Golden Gate Bridge; come learn about these stranger-than-fiction characters, and more, at THE SPOOKY, STRANGE, AND MAGICAL HISTORY OF SAN FRANCISCO. Join us for a one-of-a-kind storytelling experience about the most fascinating city in the world.

Invasion of the Body Snatchers: On Location in the Tenderloin
Oct
20
Nov 3

Invasion of the Body Snatchers: On Location in the Tenderloin

Join the Tenderloin Museum for Invasion of the Body Snatchers on Oct 20th, and Snatchers Body the of Invasion on November 3rd. The first is the classic film from 1978, and the second is that film meticulously edited shot-by-shot in reverse order by artist Anne McGuire. See the original first, and then come back for a more hopefully version where soul-less clones are gradually replaced by humans. Anne McGuire in person on November 3rd!

Litquake: Tenderloinism
Oct
10
7:00 pm19:00

Litquake: Tenderloinism

The Tenderloin Museum is hosting a 2016 Litquake event (https://litquake2016.sched.org/) on Monday Oct 10th. Tenderloinism: Tales from the 'Hood features gritty tales from the city's most misunderstood neighborhood, with Alan Black (of Edinburgh Castle), Paula Hendricks (TL apartment manager & prolific writer), Gary Kamiya (Cool Gray City of Love), David Henry Sterry & Carolyn Terry.

After Hours at the Tenderloin Museum: MSPF
Oct
7
5:30 pm17:30

After Hours at the Tenderloin Museum: MSPF

The Tenderloin Museum will be staying open late on Friday! In collaboration with the Market Street Prototyping Festival, the Museum will be hosting an evening of music, refreshments, and a lively MSPF conversation. After the festival, continue your exploration of this historic area in a Museum which captures its culture and history.

Unraveling Little Saigon’s History and Influence in the Tenderloin
Sep
22
6:00 pm18:00

Unraveling Little Saigon’s History and Influence in the Tenderloin

On September 22, join San Francisco Heritage at the Tenderloin Museum. Tho Do, former Community Organizer at the Vietnamese Youth Development Center, will chronicle Vietnamese migration, culture, and activism in the Tenderloin from the 1980s to the present.

Part of an ongoing lecture series hosted by San Francisco Heritage occurring at several venues throughout the city. From July through November, lectures are held on Thursday evenings at 6:00 p.m., with doors opening at 5:30 PM.