The Commons Block Party
Sep
21
5:00pm 5:00pm

The Commons Block Party

SF Civic Center, UN Plaza, and Fulton Street present their third-Thursday iteration of The Commons Block Party. Curated by Bay Area music and culture champion, Noise Pop, this FREE family-friendly event will feature three stages of live music, a food truck marketplace, and entertainment from various local businesses and organizations.

Join us for our Outdoor Art Gallery by Tenderloin Museum, a boutique collection of works for sale from past and future Tenderloin Museum artists such as photographers J.B. Higgins, Darwin Bell, and Marissa Patrice Leitman, and painter Ira Watkins. Jazz music will be performed by former Tenderloin Museum collaborator and Tenderloin youth advocate, Tomas Jay.

About The Commons Block Party:

The Commons Block Party on 3rd Thursdays is a series of FREE events held on four nights, one each month from 5:00 to 9:00 pm.

Headlining the September event will be French Cassettes and EagleWolfSnake on Fulton Street, Omega LIVE band in Civic Center Plaza and DUCKWRTH in UN Plaza – unique and compelling performers highlighting the diversity in San Francisco’s music scene.

The events encompass the linked public spaces in Civic Center Commons: Civic Center Plaza, UN Plaza and Fulton Street, between the Asian Art Museum and the San Francisco Main Public Library.

The Commons Block Party on 9/21 adds FREE skating & rentals from The Church of 8 Wheels http://www.churchof8wheels.com/. Listen 2 FREE music while you skate. http://civiccentercommons.org/

For more information, please visit http://www.civiccentercommons.org/, or their social media pages: https://www.instagram.com/civiccentercommons/ https://twitter.com/CivicCenter

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The Compton's Cafeteria Riot
Sep
26
6:30pm 6:30pm

The Compton's Cafeteria Riot

Scheduled to debut in early 2018, The Compton’s Cafeteria Riot is an interactive play based on the Compton’s Cafeteria riot, inspired by the Tenderloin Museum’s exhibits on the subject. It was conceived of by playwright Mark Nasser and Tenderloin Museum director Katie Conry, written in collaboration with long-term Tenderloin drag queens (and TLM collaborators) Donna Persona and Collette LeGrande

Tenderloin Museum has been a key partner in the development of the play, connecting Nassar with Tenderloin LGBT history experts Susan Stryker, and Victor Silverman, as well as legendary neighborhood drag queens for academic and first-hand accounts of the scene at the cafeteria. The Compton’s Cafeteria Riot will be performed at an unconventional venue reminiscent of Compton’s Cafeteria itself.

Nassar has completed the script, and early readings and feedback sessions at the Museum have been packed with interested audiences. The third and final workshop of The Compton’s Cafeteria Riot will be held on September 26th at 7pm. We very much value transparency and community input, and invite you to be a part of the process of this play before its 2018 premiere.

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This event is part of our Compton’s Film Series: Queens to the Front, a four-event series culminating in a final workshop of The Compton’s Cafeteria Riot, an interactive play directly inspired by the 1966 riot, produced by the Tenderloin Museum.

In the summer of 1966, a drag queen patron of the Tenderloin’s Compton’s Cafeteria threw her cup of hot coffee in the face of an police officer as he made an unwarranted attempted to arrest her. The riot that followed would be come to known as the United States’ first recorded act of militant queer resistance to social oppression and police harassment in history. Three years before the famous gay riot at New York’s Stonewall Inn, the neighborhood’s drag queens and allies banded together to fight back against their ongoing discrimination, beating the cops with their high heels and throwing furniture out of the cafeteria windows.

The Compton’s Film Series: Queens to the Front will consist of works created as a response to the story of Compton’s, the movement that followed, and the Tenderloin’s continued support of queer communities. This history is an integral component of the neighborhood’s identity, and we are honored to recognize the individuals whose tenacious spirit spawned a movement against the long history of discrimination and violence.

---

Compton’s Film Series: Queens to the Front

8/16: The Screaming Queens: The Riot at Compton’s Cafeteria

8/24: Forever’s Gonna Start Tonight

9/14: Beautiful by Night + Queens At Heart 

9/26: The Compton’s Cafeteria Riot, A Workshop 

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City Looks by J.B. Higgins
Oct
5
6:00pm 6:00pm

City Looks by J.B. Higgins

Tenderloin Museum is pleased to present City Looks by J.B. Higgins, a collection of Tenderloin-based imagery by local photographer and 2017 ArtSpan SF Open Studio Artist, J.B.Higgins. In his debut solo exhibition, Higgins continues his four-decade-long exploration of patience and repetition within his own artistic process as a portal for his audiences into the quiet nuances of day-to-day life in San Francisco.

Higgins creates his collections by visiting and revisiting, photographing and rephotographing the same spots in the city — sometimes for dozens of years — to study the role that time plays on his subjects. Minute changes, that for most would be entirely unnoticeable, become the subjects of extensive study, turning many of his pieces into lessons of patience as much as they are glimpses of an active city. With a knack for capturing moments of softness and beauty within the boisterous and ever-changing city, Higgins’ work tells the often unnoticed stories of the people, structures, and spirit of San Francisco, and more specifically, the Tenderloin.

The show is comprised of a collection of photographs, all scenes from San Francisco. The exhibition will be on view October 5th - 17th and October 31st - December 5th, with an opening reception on Thursday, October 5th at 6pm with the artist in attendance.

City Looks by J.B. Higgins is presented as part of SF Open Studios, the oldest and largest open studios program in the country. The annual, month-long art event in October and November showcases over 800 emerging and established San Francisco artists in their studios in an effort to connect collectors with artists for engaging dialog and a glimpse into the life of the working artist. City Looks by J.B. Higgins for SF Open Studios will be on view November 4th and 5th from 10am to 5pm, again with the artist in attendance. Visit the SF Open Studios website for a full list of participating artists.

About The Artist:

J.B. Higgins was born and raised in Kentucky. He was drafted into the U.S. Army during the Vietnam war era and was released in 1972. For the next 10 years he lived in Florida, Atlanta, GA, and Washington D.C. He moved to San Francisco in 1982, where he has remained for the past 35 years. His portrait, commercial, artistic, and documentary work has been shown in various movies and magazines, as well Magnet Gallery, Art Saves Lives Gallery and the Castro Country Club. This is his first show with the Tenderloin Museum.

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Beautiful By Night + Queens At Heart
Sep
14
6:30pm 6:30pm

Beautiful By Night + Queens At Heart

Beautiful By Night is a documentary film and photo series that follows three older drag entertainers, Donna Personna, Collette LeGrande, and Olivia Hart, at famed San Francisco gay bar, Aunt Charlie's, over the course of one evening. Directed by James Hosking (The California Sunday Magazine, Mother Jones, The Washington Post) and shot by Vanessa Carr and the film has received a Platinum Award from the Spotlight Documentary Film Awards, was chosen by Vimeo as a Staff Pick, and has been screened at the Boston LGBT Festival, Frameline, Atlanta Documentary Fest.

Beautiful By Night will be shown alongside Queens At Heart, a rare and provocative glimpse into pre-Stonewall queer life. Now celebrating its 50th anniversary the 1967 short documentary introduces us to four trans women and explores their histories, travails, and dreams. The film is screened with permission by Outfest / UCLA Legacy Project.

Beautiful By Night + Queens At Heart will be held on September 14th; reception at 6:30pm, screening at 7pm with drag performances by Donna Personna, Collette LeGrande, and Olivia Hart.

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This event is part of our Compton’s Film Series: Queens to the Front, a four-event series culminating in a final workshop of The Compton’s Cafeteria Riot, an interactive play directly inspired by the 1966 riot, produced by the Tenderloin Museum.

In the summer of 1966, a drag queen patron of the Tenderloin’s Compton’s Cafeteria threw her cup of hot coffee in the face of an police officer as he made an unwarranted attempted to arrest her. The riot that followed would be come to known as the United States’ first recorded act of militant queer resistance to social oppression and police harassment in history. Three years before the famous gay riot at New York’s Stonewall Inn, the neighborhood’s drag queens and allies banded together to fight back against their ongoing discrimination, beating the cops with their high heels and throwing furniture out of the cafeteria windows.

The Compton’s Film Series: Queens to the Front will consist of works created as a response to the story of Compton’s, the movement that followed, and the Tenderloin’s continued support of queer communities. This history is an integral component of the neighborhood’s identity, and we are honored to recognize the individuals whose tenacious spirit spawned a movement against the long history of discrimination and violence.

---

Compton’s Film Series: Queens to the Front

8/16: The Screaming Queens: The Riot at Compton’s Cafeteria

8/24: Forever’s Gonna Start Tonight

9/14: Beautiful by Night + Queens At Heart 

9/26: The Compton’s Cafeteria Riot, A Workshop 

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Cocktails for a Cause with Tenderloin Museum
Sep
13
6:00pm 6:00pm

Cocktails for a Cause with Tenderloin Museum

Join us at Virgil’s Sea Room on Wednesday, September 13th for COCKTAILS FOR A CAUSE, a night of boozing in support of LGBTQ-focused arts! 

Raise a glass (and a bit of funding) for the upcoming production of Compton’s Cafeteria Riot, an interactive play directly inspired by the historical 1966 riot — one of the first recorded militant uprising by the transgender and queer community against police harassment in US history — produced by the Tenderloin Museum.

Supporters of the museum are integral in keeping the history of LGBTQ communities alive in San Francisco. The history of these marginalized groups is an essential component of the city’s identity, and together with allies like you, we are honored to recognize the individuals whose tenacious spirit spawned a movement against the long history of discrimination and violence.

With your help, we can bring the stories of the pioneering trans and queer individuals to a new generation of San Franciscans.

How can you help? By joining us for a cocktail! Sip a Vicki Marlane, a specialty sweet and sassy cocktail named after the famed Tenderloin drag queen herself. A portion of each drink sold, in addition to the $5-$10 suggested donation at the door, will go directly to support production costs of the Compton’s Cafeteria Riot.

Come by from 6pm to 9pm to hang out with Tenderloin Museum on Virgil’s patio, raise a glass, and celebrate the queer groups that help make San Francisco, San Francisco.

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About the Play:

Compton’s Cafeteria Riot, is an upcoming interactive play by Bay Area-based artist Mark Nassar inspired by the eponymous 1966 uprising for TLGB rights. Taking place in the Tenderloin and predating the more famous Stonewall Inn riot in New York City by three years, the Compton’s Cafeteria Riot still remains relatively unknown. With San Francisco on the verge of creating the nation’s first-ever TLGB Cultural District—a move grounded partly in the significance of the Compton’s riots—there has never been a better time to support cultural projects that celebrate this rich history. 

This project will combine artistic innovation with powerful historical reference, emphasizing research, high-quality production, and contemporary staging through site-specific location and audience interaction. In this way, program partners will deploy vibrancy and creativity of the Bay Area’s theater community to share this critical LGBTQ story with a wide audience.

Since 2016, the Tenderloin Museum has been a key partner in the development of the play, connecting Nassar with Tenderloin LGBT history expert Victor Silverman, as well as legendary neighborhood drag queens Donna Personna and Collette LeGrande, for academic and first-hand accounts of the scene at Compton’s Cafeteria. Nassar has completed the script, and early readings and feedback sessions at the Museum have been packed with interested audiences.

Mark Nassar along with Tenderloin Museum director Katie Conry conceived of the idea of an interactive play based on the Compton’s Cafeteria riot, inspired by the Tenderloin Museum’s exhibits on the subject. Nasser, in collaboration with long-term Tenderloin drag queens Donna Persona and Collette LeGrande, has spent the past year writing the play The Riot in Compton’s Cafeteria.


Compton’s Cafeteria Riot is set to premiere in early 2018.

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Gay San Francisco
Sep
7
7:00pm 7:00pm

Gay San Francisco

Tenderloin Museum is pleased to present, for the first time in its entirety, Gay San Francisco, a documentary film delving into the Tenderloin’s early queer movements during the ‘60s and ‘70s.

Created by filmmaker Jonathan Raymond, the full-length, never-before-screened Gay San Francisco gives an unabashedly raw window into queer life decades ago. Restored from its original 16mm film, and transferred to digital in a collaboration between Tenderloin Museum and California Preservation Program, this extended version features, among other new scenes, lesbian subject matter and a fetish “tickle sacrifice” scene. A true mondo film with no shortage of pornographic material, Gay San Francisco tackles its gay and erotic themes with a respect and humor that was all but unheard of at the time of its shooting. This footage — along with scenes from San Francisco’s thriving LGBTQ culture, interviews with gay men and transwomen, and rare pieces from a Halloween drag show at the historic On The Levee gay bar — give a shockingly complete depiction of homosexual life in San Francisco, and more specifically, the Tenderloin, San Francisco’s first queer neighborhood.

Gay San Francisco was discovered by filmmakers Susan Stryker and Victor Silverman during research for their Emmy-winning documentary Screaming Queens: The Riot at Compton’s Cafeteria, which includes footage from Gay San Francisco. The original 8mm film was generously given to Stryker and Silverman by Ed Muckerman, cinematographer of Gay San Francisco.

The restoration of the film was a collaboration between Tenderloin Museum and California Preservation Society as a part of California Reveale, a State Library initiative to help digitize, preserve, and serve online historically significant Californiana. California Revealed is currently accepting submissions on behalf of the Tenderloin Museum. Participants are encouraged to bring in material related to the history of the Tenderloin (e.g., books, documents, photographs, audiovisual recordings) to be digitized and added to the Tenderloin Museum’s digital collection as well as the California Light and Sound collection. In exchange, participants will get free copies of the files. The Tenderloin Museum will gather basic description and help send the original materials to California Revealed for digitization. The next deadline for nominations will be Spring 2018.

To arrange a drop-off, please contact the Tenderloin Museum at info@tenderloinmuseum.org.

Since 2010, California Revealed and its sibling project, the California Audiovisual Preservation Project, have worked with over 150 partner institutions across the state — including public libraries and local historical societies — to help preserve California’s history through digitizing materials, making them available online, and providing long-term storage. For more information about California Revealed please visit the California Preservation Program.

Bryn Hoffman, archivist with California Revealed, will be speaking following the screening of Gay San Francisco. Hoffman specializes in “non-av” materials: photos and print. She has previously done work at the Internet Archive and the Freedom Archives in San Francisco, and as a rural librarian in Vermont. She received her MLIS in archival studies from Simmons College in 2016.

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Concerts at the Cadillac Redux: Celebrating The Fab Four & The First Lady of Song
Aug
31
7:00pm 7:00pm

Concerts at the Cadillac Redux: Celebrating The Fab Four & The First Lady of Song

Tenderloin Museum is pleased to present Concerts at the Cadillac Redux: Celebrating The Fab Four & The First Lady of Song, an evening honoring 100 years since the birth of Ella Fitzgerald and the 50th Anniversary of the Beatles’ iconic Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart Club Band.

In Concerts at the Cadillac Redux, Tenderloin Museum celebrates the Cadillac Hotel’s Concerts at the Cadillac, a monthly event created to provide high-quality music for hotel occupants and the residents of the district. The ongoing programming seeks to uplift and empower the neighborhood via the very music that was born in the Tenderloin. Concerts at the Cadillac Redux will feature jazz artist and Tenderloin tenant counselor, educator, and community activist, Pam Coates. As our leading Tenderloin Museum tour guide, her valuable insight into the neighborhood has been integral to the museum’s identity since its inception. Coates will be performing alongside Benn "The Bass Of The Bay" Bacot, a local jazz singer whose stylings have been compared to Billy Eckstine, Joe Williams, and Nat King Cole.

These vocalists will be channeling iconic music that enraptured the world, including selections from The Beatles’ 1967 album, Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, a record lauded for its unprecedented innovation in songwriting, sound design, cover art, and concepts. The eighth studio album by the famed English group won four Grammy Awards — including Album of the Year, and has been called “the most important rock & roll album ever made” by Rolling Stone Magazine.

The 50th Anniversary of the famed album coincides with the centennial of the birth of "The First Lady of Song,” Ella Fitzgerald. The winner of 13 Grammy awards, Fitzgerald worked with virtually every jazz great of the time, and has sold over 40 million albums.

Pam Coates and Benn Bacot are pleased to celebrate these great artists in collaboration with the Cadillac Hotel and Tenderloin Museum.

 

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Forever's Gonna Start Tonight
Aug
24
6:30pm 6:30pm

Forever's Gonna Start Tonight

Forever’s Gonna Start Tonight chronicles the remarkable experiences of Vicki Marlane, a drag performer still strutting it onstage in her seventies. Vicki takes us on the ride of her life — from rollerskating crossdressed in her youth, to hoochie-coochie girl carnival sideshows and romantic road trips. We hitchhike through the adventures that led to her being San Francisco’s “Toast of the Town” in the early ’70s, and Vicki even shares her tips of the trade acquired from decades of drag experience at hot-spot venues including Aunt Charlie’s in the Tenderloin District. Directed by Michelle Lawler, and produced by archivist and historian Kim Klausner (It’s Elementary:Talking About Gay Issues In School, Frameline20) and Emmy Award-winning Susan Stryker (Screaming Queens: The Riot at Compton’s Cafeteria, Frameline30), this film is a loving tribute to a legend.

Forever’s Gonna Start Tonight will be held on August 24th; reception at 6:30pm, screening at 7pm followed by a discussion with producers Susan Stryker and Kim Klausner.

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This event is part of our Compton’s Film Series: Queens to the Front, a four-event series culminating in a final workshop of The Compton’s Cafeteria Riot, an interactive play directly inspired by the 1966 riot, produced by the Tenderloin Museum.

In the summer of 1966, a drag queen patron of the Tenderloin’s Compton’s Cafeteria threw her cup of hot coffee in the face of an police officer as he made an unwarranted attempted to arrest her. The riot that followed would be come to known as the United States’ first recorded act of militant queer resistance to social oppression and police harassment in history. Three years before the famous gay riot at New York’s Stonewall Inn, the neighborhood’s drag queens and allies banded together to fight back against their ongoing discrimination, beating the cops with their high heels and throwing furniture out of the cafeteria windows.

The Compton’s Film Series: Queens to the Front will consist of works created as a response to the story of Compton’s, the movement that followed, and the Tenderloin’s continued support of queer communities. This history is an integral component of the neighborhood’s identity, and we are honored to recognize the individuals whose tenacious spirit spawned a movement against the long history of discrimination and violence.

---

Compton’s Film Series: Queens to the Front

8/16: The Screaming Queens: The Riot at Compton’s Cafeteria

8/24: Forever’s Gonna Start Tonight

9/14: Beautiful by Night + Queens At Heart 

9/26: The Compton’s Cafeteria Riot, A Workshop 

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Sunday Streets: Tenderloin Museum + Skywatchers
Aug
20
11:00am11:00am

Sunday Streets: Tenderloin Museum + Skywatchers

Sunday Streets returns!

Sunday, August 20th, from 11am - 4pm, a mile of streets in the Tenderloin will be transformed into a car-free community space filled with free, family-friendly activities. Join Tenderloin Museum as we celebrate our neighborhood’s non-profits, community groups, businesses, and residents.

We’re proud to have partnered with Skywatchers, an ensemble of Tenderloin residents, founded in 2011, who come together and use poetry, music, and dance to share stories and life experiences from the TL. Skywatchers believes in the power of art and collective creative endeavors to transform lives, embody our interconnectedness, and infuse our lives with agency, possibility, and celebration. The Sunday Streets performance will feature excerpts from I GOT A TRUTH TO TELL (full performance coming to CounterPulse this October!), drumming led by the Skywatchers drumming ensemble, and solos by Dr. Dreame, Kim Mays, Lee Staples, and other Tenderloin artists.

Catch the performance at 1:30pm, outside 509 Ellis St., adjacent to Tenderloin National Forest.

*Photo by Deirdre Visser

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The Screaming Queens: The Riot at Compton's Cafeteria
Aug
16
6:30pm 6:30pm

The Screaming Queens: The Riot at Compton's Cafeteria

Directors Susan Stryker and Victor Silverman’s award winning documentary, The Screaming Queens: The Riot at Compton’s Cafeteria, tells the forgotten story of the first collective act of militant resistance to the social oppression of queer people in the United States–a 1966 riot by transgender prostitutes at a late night cafeteria in San Francisco. The Screaming Queens was awarded an Emmy during The 35th Annual Northern California Area EMMY® Awards For Outstanding Achievement in the Historical/Cultural category.

The Screaming Queens will be held on August 16th; reception at 6:30pm, screening at 7pm with directors Susan Stryker (professor of Gender and Women’s Studies at the University of Arizona, Director of the Institute for LGBT Studies) and Victor Silverman (Professor and past Chair of the History Department and the American Studies Program at Pomona College) in attendance.

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This event is part of our Compton’s Film Series: Queens to the Front, a four-event series culminating in a final workshop of The Compton’s Cafeteria Riot, an interactive play directly inspired by the 1966 riot, produced by the Tenderloin Museum.

In the summer of 1966, a drag queen patron of the Tenderloin’s Compton’s Cafeteria threw her cup of hot coffee in the face of an police officer as he made an unwarranted attempted to arrest her. The riot that followed would be come to known as the United States’ first recorded act of militant queer resistance to social oppression and police harassment in history. Three years before the famous gay riot at New York’s Stonewall Inn, the neighborhood’s drag queens and allies banded together to fight back against their ongoing discrimination, beating the cops with their high heels and throwing furniture out of the cafeteria windows.

The Compton’s Film Series: Queens to the Front will consist of works created as a response to the story of Compton’s, the movement that followed, and the Tenderloin’s continued support of queer communities. This history is an integral component of the neighborhood’s identity, and we are honored to recognize the individuals whose tenacious spirit spawned a movement against the long history of discrimination and violence.

---

Compton’s Film Series: Queens to the Front

8/16: The Screaming Queens: The Riot at Compton’s Cafeteria

8/24: Forever’s Gonna Start Tonight

9/14: Beautiful by Night + Queens At Heart 

9/26: The Compton’s Cafeteria Riot, A Workshop 

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The Sardine Swims to the Tenderloin Museum
Aug
10
6:00pm 6:00pm

The Sardine Swims to the Tenderloin Museum

The Tenderloin Museum presents The Sardine Swims to the Tenderloin Museum, an interactive, multidisciplinary performance piece by dancer, choreographer, and artist Melissa Lewis.

Best known as the founder of the sardine, a tiny (9' x 12') Tenderloin-based studio space, Lewis creates works in a style of contemporary dance that’s best described as a combination of physical theater and visual performance art. Located within artist collective Get High On Mountains since March 2017, the non-traditional space takes the idea of “intimate stage” to the extremity, creating a highly proximal setting which requires audiences to watch and think about movement in a new way.

In The Sardine Swims to the Tenderloin Museum, the artist will explore the literal confines of a space — via physical found art sardine tins, as well as the conceptual confines of space — via a painters tape “recreation” of the sardine space. Lewis, whose works in her own unusual performance space are inherently site-specific, will present a new take on her personal execution of contemporary dance by immersing herself (alongside fellow dancer Danny Nguyen) in the new and vastly different environment of the Tenderloin Museum.

Melissa Lewis moved from Massachusetts in 2010 to study Performing Arts & Social Justice at the University of San Francisco. Since then she has visited her 105-year-old Chinese grandmother weekly, made coffee to support dancing professionally, and discovered a film photography practice at Rayko. She is a company member of detour dance and has a short dance film (titled pretty clean) to premiere this year. the sardine is her most recent project.

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Ira Watkins: From Waco to San Francisco
Aug
3
6:00pm 6:00pm

Ira Watkins: From Waco to San Francisco

The Tenderloin Museum is pleased to present the opening reception of Ira Watkins: From Waco to San Francisco, a collection of paintings by celebrated self-taught artist and current San Francisco resident, Ira Watkins. A true force whose career spans almost 30 years, Watkins’ body of work depicts the communities that he is a part of — from Waco, Texas to San Francisco, California — and helps to bridge the chasm between the perception of history and the true stories of the people, places, and events that shaped Black America.

Born in Waco, in 1941, Watkins relocated to San Francisco after a single, brief visit as a teenager, and supported himself by winning billiards and staying with new, easily made friends. Following a string of bad luck that included a crack-cocaine related arrest by an undercover cop dressed as Michael Jackson and a brief stint in prison for possession of a firearm, Watkins consciously shifted his attentions from self-destruction to painting. As told to The New York Times in 2015, in art he’d simply found “something [he] liked to do better.” He credits Tenderloin nonprofits such as the Hospitality House and Wildflowers Institute as the safehouses in which he was able to pursue and hone his craft.  

Now, Watkins’ work can be found in several of the Bay Area’s most notable exhibition spaces, including the Asian Art Museum, Luggage Store gallery, and the University of California. Similarly, his paintings can still be seen in Waco, where January 17th is officially “Ira Watkins Day” in honor of one of his most acclaimed murals: A scene of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. delivering his iconic Lincoln Memorial “I Have a Dream” speech that overlooks Waco’s city center. His impressive exhibition history includes over 30 gallery and museum shows, both in solo and group shows.

Revered for a style of painting that draws similarities to 15th century European art in terms of arrangement and tone, Watkins flips the script of traditionally white iconography. By portraying the upper echelon of symbolism and stock characters as African Americans and Tenderloin personalities, Watkins challenges current American social hierarchies and breathes a certain air of dignity and respect into otherwise marginalized groups.

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 A Day in the Life: The World of Humans Who Use Drugs
Jul
27
6:30pm 6:30pm

A Day in the Life: The World of Humans Who Use Drugs

The film A Day in the Life: The World of Humans Who Use Drugs takes us through one day in the life of eight people, from seven cities, in seven different countries of the world, from morning until night. They all have something in common - all of them use drugs. But these people are not defined by their drug use. All of them have their unique personalities, stories, and social networks. And the environment in which they live, the attitudes they face, the laws that regulate drug use, and the health services available to them have an enormous impact on their lives. It strives to challenge our common myths and preconceptions about drugs and the people who use them. It gives a voice to those representing one of the most marginalized communities of our world, and shows how they engage in social activism to break the silence and fight the stigma that shadows their days.

Join us for a screening of the film at the Tenderloin Museum on July 27th at 6:30/7, and a panel discussion following the film with Eliza Wheeler (Drug Overdose Prevention and Education Project Manager), Taeko Frost (Filmmaker & co-producer of A Day in the Life), Holly (International Harm Reduction Activist), Isaac Jackson (Director of Urban Survivors Union), Janet Ector (LEAD & Harm Reduction Program Coordinator at Glide), and Paul Harkin (HIV/Hep C & Harm Reduction Program Manager at Glide). These leaders in the field of harm reduction will discuss plans to bring supervised drug consumption services (SCS) to California to promote health, dignity, and respect for people who use drugs.

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The Riot in Compton’s Cafeteria: Play Workshop
Jul
18
6:30pm 6:30pm

The Riot in Compton’s Cafeteria: Play Workshop

Join us for the second-ever reading of scenes from a new play about Tenderloin history, The Compton’s Cafeteria Riot, based on events surrounding the United States’ first-ever anti-police riot by the LGBTQ community. Mark Nassar along with Tenderloin Museum director Katie Conry conceived of the idea of an interactive play based on the Compton’s Cafeteria riot, inspired by the Tenderloin Museum’s exhibits on the subject. Nassar, in collaboration with long-term Tenderloin drag queens (and TLM collaborators) Donna Persona and Collette LeGrande, has spent the past year writing the play The Compton’s Cafeteria Riot. The first ever reading took place for a packed house at the Tenderloin Museum Turns Two. On July 18th the actors will read a revised version based on feedback from this first performance. We very much value transparency and community input, and invite you to be a part of the process of workshopping this play. The play will premiere in its finalized form this fall in the Tenderloin.

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Dashiell Hammett with Don Herron
Jul
13
6:00pm 6:00pm

Dashiell Hammett with Don Herron

Join us next Thursday July 18th at the Tenderloin Museum for a discussion of the Tenderloin's preeminent author Dashiell Hammett, and a screening of pre-code adaptations of his most famous novels.

Described by The New York Times as one of Hammett’s “pre-eminent appreciators”, Don Herron, will lead a discussion about Hammett’s work in conjunction with a screening of selections from Hammett’s pre-code film The Maltese Falcon (1931), along with The Thin Man (1934) screened in its entirety. Providing historical reference for both films, Don Herron will discuss Hammett’s relationship with the Tenderloin before the screening. 

Tickets here: www.eventbrite.com/e/dashiell-hammett-with-don-herron-tickets-35799288636

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Peter Fortuna: A Tenderloin Story
Jul
6
6:00pm 6:00pm

Peter Fortuna: A Tenderloin Story

Tenderloin Museum presents Peter Fortuna: A Tenderloin Story, an abbreviated retrospective featuring the photography and ephemera of Peter Fortuna. On view will be a collaged selection of original photographs, magazine tearsheets, correspondence, and digital photographs by Peter Fortuna spanning 1970-1998. Join us at Tenderloin Museum on July 6th 6-8pm for a celebration of Fortuna's unique life in photography. The opening reception will feature refreshments along with footage from the 1991 Fortuna produced film, ‘War.’

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Museums with Pride 2017
Jun
25
10:30am10:30am

Museums with Pride 2017

Tenderloin Museum is proud to participate in this years San Francisco Pride Parade along with many Bay Area museums and arts organizations under the banner “Museums with Pride.” Museums with Pride will march in the 47th Annual #SanFranciscoPride Parade, which kicks off at 10:30am on Market Street. Look out for us and give us a cheer!
Participating organizations are listed below:

SFMOMA
Tenderloin Museum
The Contemporary Jewish Museum
Asian Art Museum
California Academy of Sciences
California Historical Society
Cartoon Art Museum
Exploratorium
Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco
Museum of African Diaspora
Walt Disney Family Museum
Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

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Anywhere Zines Closing Reception
Jun
24
2:00pm 2:00pm

Anywhere Zines Closing Reception

Join us for the closing reception of Anywhere Zines on June 24th from 2 pm - 5 pm. The show is a culmination of artist Raphael Villet's 5 month residency at the Tenderloin Museum. The exhibition chronicles the 5 months that Raphael spent facilitating a space on the street for people to make art, write stories, and share knowledge through zines. In collaboration with the Tenderloin Museum, Raphael released an Anthology book housing all the zines made by 45+ people in the Tenderloin during his residency. 

This free community Saturday afternoon event features Tenderloin performances and refreshments. Also, Raphael will set up outside the TL Museum and make zines with attendees and neighbors. An exhibition featuring zines and photographs chronicling the artist's process will be on display in the Tenderloin Museum Gallery, and the Zine Anthology will be available for viewing and purchasing. 

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Jazz in the Neighborhood: Lorca Hart Organ Trio
Jun
8
6:30pm 6:30pm

Jazz in the Neighborhood: Lorca Hart Organ Trio

On Thursday June 8th, join the Tenderloin Museum for Jazz in the Neighborhood featuring the Lorca Hart Organ Trio and a special emerging musicians set to accompany the evening performances.

The Lorca Hart Organ Trio, featuring Brian Ho on Hammond B3 organ, Mike Scott on guitar, and Lorca on drums, is rooted in the classic Jazz organ sound (Jimmy Smith, Larry Young; Jazz Standards and Be Bop) but also explores more contemporary elements and structures (original compositions; John Scofield, Joshua Redman, John Ellis, R+B and pop compositions) to create it’s own unique musical identity.

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Raphael Villet - Artist in Residence Celebration
Jun
1
5:00pm 5:00pm

Raphael Villet - Artist in Residence Celebration

Join us for the culmination of Artist Raphael Villet's 5 month residency at the Tenderloin Museum of San Francisco. Raphael will release an Anthology book that will house all the zines made by 45+ people in the Tenderloin during his residency. The exhibition will chronicle the 5 months that Raphael spent facilitating a space on the street for people to make art, write stories and share knowledge through zines!

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This is Not a Gun Closing Reception
May
24
6:00pm 6:00pm

This is Not a Gun Closing Reception

For the month of May at the Tenderloin Museum Gallery, artists Amanda Eicher and Cara Levine have activated an interactive artwork and exhibit titled This Is Not A Gun as a part of 100 Days Action. On Wednesday, May 24 from 6-8PM the exhibit will close with a community dialogue and art-making workshop led by Amanda Eicher. Throughout these first 100 days, sculptor Cara Levine has been carving wood replicas of common objects mistaken by police as weapons that resulted in police shootings, based on a list of these objects published in Harper’s Magazine in December 2016. About her sculptural inquiry, the artist says, “We do not know the outcome of these shootings. We do know that none of these items are guns. We want to understand this error. We want to understand through questioning, grieving, looking, and making. We want to understand together, as community.” Amanda Eicher, artist and organizer has engaged in continual dialogue with both Bay Area community and Richmond Police members surrounding this national crisis. Through this series of dialogues and hands-on workshops, Amanda Eicher and Cara Levine invite the public to honor and try to understand these objects, and the lives they have impacted. Participants will sculpt their own replica objects out of clay and be invited to contribute to an open dialogue as a part of the artist talk and exhibit closing workshop at the Tenderloin Museum on May 24.

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Tenderloin Museum Turns Two
May
13
4:00pm 4:00pm

Tenderloin Museum Turns Two

The Tenderloin Museum marks its 2nd anniversary in the midst of an important year in the history of San Francisco – it’s the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love and the 100th anniversary of the “anti-vice” Tenderloin neighborhood shutdown. On Saturday, May 13, the Tenderloin Museum is inviting its friends and neighbors to celebrate the Tenderloin’s unique contributions to San Francisco history with daylong free museum admission and free public programs from 4 pm to 9 pm, featuring accounts of the “Invisible Circus” from the Diggers, San Francisco Chronicle Columnist David Talbot, the first-ever reading of the new play The Compton’s Cafeteria Riot, and a dynamic jazz night by SF Recovery Theater. We’re excited to show off the best the neighborhood has to offer and celebrate the 31 square blocks we call home.

Programming Schedule:

 4pm, The Diggers' "Invisible Circus" Remembered

Come hear what the Summer of Love was like in the Tenderloin. Judy Goldhaft (original participant in the Diggers) and Eric Noble (Diggers archivist) talk with LisaRuth Elliott (Shaping San Francisco's co-director) about who the Diggers were, and their radical anti-capitalist philosophy and activities. They will share archival materials and personal experiences from the Diggers' "Invisible Circus" Happening at Glide Church on February 24, 1967. Stories about the "Invisible Circus" became legend in San Francisco’s hip community for years. Originally billed as a 72 hour event, participants were thrown out within 24 hours. See the poster from the event and hear stories of the spectacle from the Diggers themselves.

 5pm, David Talbot on the Summer of Love, Season of the Witch, and the Tenderloin

Author of the best selling book on San Francisco’s Summer of Love and its aftermath, San Francisco Chronicle columnist David Talbot gives his unique perspective on this seminal time in history.

 6pm, The Compton’s Cafeteria Riot

Join us for the first-ever reading of scenes from a new play about Tenderloin history, The Compton’s Cafeteria Riot, based on events surrounding the United States’ first-ever anti-police riot by the LGBTQ community. Followed by dazzling drag performances by co-authors Donna Personna & Collette LeGrande, and joined by Olivia Hart (all featured in James Hosking’s film about Aunt Charlie’s bar, Beautiful by Night). The play is being co-produced by the Tenderloin Museum and writer Mark Nassar, co-creator of Tony n’ Tina’s Wedding, and will premiere this fall in the Tenderloin.

 7:30, SF Recovery Theater: Night at the Black Hawk

Join us for a raucous tour-de-force performance of some of the best musical talent in the neighborhood! Night at the Black Hawk is a live jazz concert, part of an ongoing series that reflects on the lives and stories of the artists, musicians, and residents that lived in the shadow of the Black Hawk Jazz Club.

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This is Not a Gun, Presented by 100 Days of Action & TL Museum
Apr
30
11:00am11:00am

This is Not a Gun, Presented by 100 Days of Action & TL Museum

This April 30th explore the Tenderloin neighborhood car free at Sunday Streets. Activity Hubs will be located on Ellis and Golden Gate Ave with dozens of free activities in between offered by local merchants (the Tenderloin Museum will be exhibiting at Ellis and Leavenworth). As part of our Sunday Streets activation, the Tenderloin Museum will be hosting a workshop, 100 Days of Action: This Is Not A Gun, at the TL Museum (398 Eddy St) from 11 am - 2 pm.
 

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53 Days, Locals on Stage
Apr
27
6:30pm 6:30pm

53 Days, Locals on Stage

Hotel workers tell their story. 
The rich history of organized labor in the Tenderloin includes that of today's largest San Francisco private sector union. UNITE HERE Local 2 represents approximately 12,000 hotel and restaurant workers in San Francisco and northern San Mateo county. Members of the union will read excerpts from the play, 53 Days - Local 2 on Stage, and discuss the 2004 hotel industry lockout and strike which it depicts. 

 Come see a section of this production and talk to the workers about their experience on the picket line and the proscenium. 53 Days, Local 2 on Stage is a docudrama re-creation about labor rights and speaks to the workers about their experience on the picket line. Join us for an evening celebrating the history of the labor movement in the Tenderloin.

Presented by Bill Shields, the Chair of Labor and Community Studies at City College of San Francisco, and the director of the oral history theater project, "Work Tales". 

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Lidia Yuknavitch / The Book of Joan
Apr
20
7:30pm 7:30pm

Lidia Yuknavitch / The Book of Joan

Join us as we welcome Lidia Yuknavitch for her much-anticipated novel The Book of Joan!

A raucous celebration, a searing condemnation, and a fiercely imaginative retelling of Joan of Arc’s transcendent life. -- Roxane Gay, New York Times-bestselling author of Bad Feminist

The Book of Joan is a riveting tale of destruction and the beauty found in unlikely places—even at the extreme end of post-human experience. A book suffused with dirt, sweat, and blood, it raises questions about what it means to be human, the meaning of sex and gender, and the role of art as means for survival.

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Artist Talk with Alice Combs and Susa Cortez More Than a Roof and Walls: Community Art Show
Apr
13
6:00pm 6:00pm

Artist Talk with Alice Combs and Susa Cortez More Than a Roof and Walls: Community Art Show

Root Division and Tenderloin Museum present a special evening in conversation with artists Alice Combs and Susa Cortez on Thursday, April 13th, 2017. The artists will discuss their individual art practices, and how they approach their role as teaching artists for Root Division, currently working with Tenderloin neighborhood residents. Combs and Cortez are interdisciplinary artists that have practices inclusive of traditional painting and drawing, sculpture, installation and performance. Utilizing their varied skill sets they have developed customized curriculum for students at  Kelly Cullen Community, Larkin Street Youth, and Community Housing Partnership, including the collaborative printmaking and collage projects that are currently on view alongside their own work at the Tenderloin Museum.

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San Francisco Recovery Theatre's Night at the Black Hawk
Mar
30
6:30pm 6:30pm

San Francisco Recovery Theatre's Night at the Black Hawk

San Francisco Recovery Theatre is returning to the Tenderloin Museum Thursday March 30th! Night at the Black Hawk is a live jazz concert, part of an ongoing series that reflects on the lives and stories of the artists, musicians and residents that lived in the shadow of the Black Hawk Jazz Club. This live jazz event is free and open to the public, donations accepted and appreciated.


With the loss of so many artistic and iconic figures in 2016, not to mention the unsure political footing we find ourselves in, we are left with an open wound that needs healing. San Francisco Recovery Theatre is once again pledging its commitment to provide a safe place for those that are still suffering, their family members and those in recovery. Join us on this special date in celebrating the wealth of talent that exists in our community.

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Counterpulse: Oral Portraits
Mar
23
7:00pm 7:00pm

Counterpulse: Oral Portraits

Arletta Anderson & Adam Smith, in partnership with the Tenderloin Museum and CounterPulse, present an evening of oral histories and portrait-taking of Tenderloin residents, community members, and a few stalwart volunteers. In front of a live audience, interviewees will discuss their relationship to and memories of San Francisco and the Tenderloin and how these spaces have shifted their bodies and lives over time. "Through live interviews we hope to create a portrait of not just how the city is, has, and continues to change, but how individuals have also changed over time. In this current political climate, taking a moment to come together to share our stories and reflect on our capacity to experience change is paramount to our humanity and relationship to community," Anderson and Smith shared.

Watch or participate-throughout the evening, attendees will have the opportunity to be interviewed while having their portraits taken. Oral Portraits is an invitation to reflect on living in an ever-changing landscape and hopes to capture a brief moment in participants’ lives through the simple acts of photography and conversation.

Arletta Anderson & Adam Smith make multidisciplinary work that brings together movement, theater and music. Currently artists-in-residence at CounterPulse, their newest work weather // body will be presented there April 20th through the 29th. Oral Portraits is a performance research project in support of that work.

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More Than a Roof and Walls: Community Art Show
Mar
16
6:00pm 6:00pm

More Than a Roof and Walls: Community Art Show

Root Division is proud to present the work of our Studio Artists and students at the Tenderloin Museum this spring. More Than a Roof and Walls features the work of Alice Combs and Susa Cortez alongside the work of their intergenerational students at several of our Tenderloin community partnerships including Kelly Cullen Community, Community Housing Partnership & Larkin Street Youth.

Root Divison teaching artists volunteer to teach residents and clients weekly creating meaningful art projects and experiences for populations that are settling into new homes and communities. The classes serve as a creative outlet for the imaginations of students while introducing them to a wide range of materials, projects, and ideas.

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Gay San Francisco / Meat Rack
Mar
9
6:45pm 6:45pm

Gay San Francisco / Meat Rack

On March 9th, 2017, Tenderloin Museum will host a double feature screening of Gay San Francisco (1965-1970, 30 mins) by Jonathan Raymond, and Meat Rack by Michael Thomas (1970, 70 mins) at the Roxie Theater. Gay San Francisco is a previously lost documentary, and Meat Rack is an underground film with a modern arthouse cult following. Both films depict the early queer movements in the Tenderloin, unveiling the district as the first gay neighborhood in San Francisco. Meat Rack director Michael Thomas in attendance!

The softcore rarity Meat Rack was originally produced and released by Sherpix, the company that brought underground films like Lonesome Cowboys, Pink Narcissus, and Invocation of My Demon Brother to a nationwide circuit of art house theaters. Shot mostly on the mean streets of San Francisco, this is a gritty, brooding tale of a bisexual hustler who’ll go to bed with any man or woman who offers him enough money and sexual kicks. Using both sexploitation and art film aesthetics, Meat Rack is an essential and compelling artifact of pre-hardcore adult cinema. 
 

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TL Dreams: Rea Lynn de Guzman
Feb
23
6:30pm 6:30pm

TL Dreams: Rea Lynn de Guzman

Join Root Division and the Tenderloin Museum for an artist lecture & closing reception of Rea Lynn de Guzman's TL Dreams on Thursday February 23rd. Learn about Rea’s process and hear about her experiences growing up in the Tenderloin; Doors at 6:30pm, Program at 7pm.

Rea Lynn de Guzman is an interdisciplinary artist whose work explores psychological and socio-political themes surrounding liminal identity, cultural assimilation, and the Filipino/a diaspora, tempered by her experience as a Filipina immigrant living in the United States. At the age of fourteen, she emigrated from the Philippines to the United States with her single mother, settling eventually in San Francisco. She lived in the Tenderloin—at Turk and Taylor Streets—where she spent most of her formative years (circa 2000-2005).

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Black History Month Film Series: Skywatchers Movie Night
Feb
22
5:30pm 5:30pm

Black History Month Film Series: Skywatchers Movie Night

Black History Month Film Series is a collaboration of ABD Productions/Skywatchers and community partners Tenderloin Museum, TL Votes, Faithful Fools, and Glide. These organizations will be hosting screenings of the films 13th, The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution, and Free Angela and All Political Prisoners at various locations throughout the Tenderloin, concluding in a facilitated discussion each night.

“Free Angela and All Political Prisoners” - Presented by the Tenderloin Museum
February 22nd at the Tenderloin Museum (398 Eddy Street) 5:30 pm

Free and open to the public.

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Centennial of the Insuppressible Tenderloin
Feb
15
to Feb 16

Centennial of the Insuppressible Tenderloin

The Tenderloin Museum and the Black Cat present an evening in recognition of the centennial anniversary of the Tenderloin vice district closures of 1917, on February 15, 2017 from 5:30 pm - 1 am. Join us for an evening of live entertainment at the Black Cat and celebrate 100 years of resistance to traditional social mores in the Tenderloin.

The historical efforts by reformers to close and establish a “moral” alliance in the heart of the Tenderloin, denying working women and their patrons essential freedoms and protections concluded with a neighborhood wide closure of bars and bordellos (including the original Black Cat) on February 15, 1917. Having closed down San Francisco’s notorious Barbary Coast for good in 1913, reformers assumed that they had also won a thorough cleanup of the Tenderloin once and for all. Only a few short years after reformers declared victory, the Tenderloin came back stronger than ever. The 1917 campaign would be the first of many establishment attacks on the Tenderloin’s challenge to traditional social values. 

Open to the public. Bar is first come, first served. To make a reservation for dining: www.opentable.com/r/black-cat-san-francisco

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